How To Create Hydrangea Centerpieces

LAST UPDATED: May 17, 2020 | PUBLISHED: May 17, 2020 | By: Julie Blanner

Hydrangea Centerpieces are among the easiest and least expensive to create. Learn how to create beautiful hydrangea arrangements in just a few minutes with this step-by-step tutorial and easy to follow video.

An all white hydrangea centerpiece on a textured neutral surface.

If you want to learn how to arrange flowers, hydrangea is a great place to start. Hydrangea are easily accessible at most grocers and possibly in your own backyard!

I love creating fresh floral arrangements, it’s truly like my own personal form of therapy. And I love to share what I’ve learned along the way!

Don’t miss my tutorials for a ranunculus centerpiece, woodland floral arrangement, how to arrange roses, and more! And don’t skip my florist secrets post – you can learn how to be your own florist!

I like to give a lot of detail in my tutorials to guide readers through any questions. If you’re just here for the printable how-to, feel free to click “jump to how-to” right under the title of this post and you’ll head straight there!

Hydrangea Centerpieces are not only one of the easiest to arrange, but they’re so versatile. White can lend itself to weddings, showers, nautical themes, summer soirees and more.

In the winter, just add red hypericum berries for a festive flair. Pink or blue are perfect for baby showers, spring, summer and fall occasions. I especially love dried hydrangea in the fall.

hydrangea centerpieces on a teak table on an deck.

Where to Buy Hydrangea

  • your local grocer
  • Whole Foods – $8/3 stems
  • Trader Joe’s – 5.99/3 stems

You can learn more about Trader Joe’s Flowers and Where to Buy Flowers here.

Tips to Arrange Hydrangea

  • There are a few easy rules of thumb when working with hydrangea.
  • First, when possible, work in odd numbers. 3, 5, 7.
  • Second, you can create a hydrangea centerpiece using only hydrangea but they make great filler, so don’t be afraid to mix them with other blooms.
  • Third, you can break them up by nestling other flowers inside over their over-sized blooms giving the illusion of more, smaller hydrangea.
  • Hydrangea are happy when well hydrated. Whether they are looking droopy, you’re just bringing them home from the store or you are in the midst of arranging them, be sure to cut their stems at an angle and place in fresh water.
white hydrangea centerpiece on a teak table outdoors.

How to Create Hydrangea Centerpieces

  1. Fill a vase with water.
  2. Measure 3 hydrangea stems to equal length to set just above the vase at opposite angles. Cut stems at an angle and remove any leaves that will fall below the rim of the vase.
  3. Continue with hydrangea or work with your next largest blooms and repeat to fill.
  4. If working with more than 1 type of flower, add a third flower in to fill at 3 points in the vase, creating a triangle.

I walk you through step by step in this video I shot via iPhone for Instagram over the weekend. I decided to include it here as well in hopes it might show you just how easy it is!

4th of july flags in a white hydrangea centerpiece on a teak outdoor table.

Hydrangea Bouquets: Your Questions Answered

How many hydrangea stems for a centerpiece?

Generally speaking, I like to think in terms of odd numbers for my floral arrangements.

With that said, you can use three, five, or seven stems and you’re sure to have a great design triangle as a result. The number of stems that you use is largely dependent on the size of your vase!

However, because hydrangeas are so fluffy and large, it’s possible to use any number of stems and you won’t be able to tell where one starts and the next begins. Just enjoy the process!

What flowers look good with hydrangeas in an arrangement?

I think the question is more what flowers DON’T look good with hydrangeas! Because of their fluffy, rounded heads, many blooms will mix beautifully with their shape.

Consider ranunculus, roses, lisianthus, and even carnations to accompany your hydrangea. They also look beautiful with accents of draping greenery stems.

Personally, I would avoid stems that have a long, pointed effect, as they can be difficult to arrange with the broader “face” of the hydrangea blooms. Avoid adding stiff stems like liatrus, delphinium, larkspur, unless you’re a more experienced designer.

How do I arrange my hydrangea centerpieces?

Simply follow the step by step tutorial included below, or watch the included video! I promise, it’s so much easier than you might think!

How do you make a large hydrangea centerpiece?

The larger your vase, the more stems you’re going to need to fill the opening. Watch the included video and then multiply your stem counts according to the size of your larger vase!

If you want to create a tall, slender arrangement for an event, you should consider a floral foam base. This would rest directly on top of your vase and eliminate much of the stem work necessary for creating a larger scale centerpiece.

Learn how to revive wilted hydrangea in the YouTube video below, and don’t forget to subscribe!

You can find more flower arranging tutorials and my favorite vases / vessels to arrange in here.

More Popular Floral Tutorials 

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hydrangea centerpieces
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Hydrangea Centerpiece

Hydrangea Centerpieces are among the easiest and least expensive to create. Learn how to create beautiful Hydrangea Centerpieces in just a few minutes with this step-by-step tutorial and easy to follow video.
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 1 centerpiece
Cost 18

Equipment

  • Vase
  • Shears

Ingredients

  • hydrangea

Instructions

  • Fill a vase with water.
  • Measure 3 hydrangea stems to equal length to set just above the vase at opposite angles. Cut stems at an angle and remove any leaves that will fall below the rim of the vase.
  • Continue with hydrangea or work with your next largest blooms and repeat to fill.
  • If working with more than 1 type of flower, add a third flower in to fill at 3 points in the vase, creating a triangle.

Video

Notes

  • When possible, work in odd numbers. 3, 5, 7
  • Don’t be afraid to mix them with other blooms
  • Break them up by nestling other flowers inside over their oversized blooms giving the illusion of more, smaller hydrangea
  • Hydrangea are happy when well hydrated. Whether they are looking droopy, you’re just bringing them home from the store or you are in the midst of arranging them, be sure to cut their stems at an angle and place in fresh water
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