DIY Pressed Botanical Wall Art

Learn how to press flowers to create beautiful diy pressed botanical wall art

For years I’ve been filling our home with framed botanicals, some printed from vintage books and even an original botanical that Chris gifted me on our copper anniversary {because they copper plated them to print original books}. Botanicals make me feel at ease. Still, I kept dreaming of adding pressed botanical wall art. Giannetti Home offers beautiful Mexican Sage for nearly $600 and Restoration Hardware offers smaller pressed botanicals on linen for $200, but given that I’m always going over budget, I decided to attempt making a pressed botanical myself before splurging on one. You know me, I was working last minute, biting my nails hoping I would find success. I found a lot more than that. I found that sometimes the process is just as beautiful as the final result. It’s something I need to remind myself when struggling. With each touch of the iron, fragrance was released, creating an aromatic experience. Bonus for making a botanical!

How to press flowers | DIY wall art press botanical

When I first considered this project, I planned to do it the old fashioned way like I did with my Grandma, but placing the stem between a sheet of parchment paper in a book, under a heavy pile of books for weeks. But you know me, I procrastinated and that was no longer an option. Ironing your stem removes the moisture, without aging it, making it and ideal method for wall art.

To create your own pressed botanical wall art you’ll need:

stem from the plant of choice {herbs, ferns, flowers}

book {optional}

iron

several sheets of white paper

mounting paper or linen trimmed to the size of your frame

glue

toothpick

tweezers

spray adhesive

frame

Instructions:

  1. For thicker flowers, place two pieces of paper in the middle of the book, center your stem, close and stand on your book to press the flower. Learn how to press flowers to create beautiful diy pressed botanical wall art
  2. Place a few sheets of paper on hard surface/ironing board. Position your stem and add 2 sheets of paper on top. Don't wait for flowers to dry, try this easy tutorial to dry flowers and create your own pressed botanical wall art
  3. Iron your stem, without steam on medium-high heat, with pressure, lifting rather than continuously moving the iron. Hold down a few seconds at a time, then move to the next area. Continue until you do the entire stem once. Learn how to press flowers to create beautiful diy pressed botanical wall art
  4. Replace your paper, reposition if needed {stem will still have moisture and be flexible} and repeat until stem is completely dry. Moisture and oils will transfer to your paper. How to press flowers | DIY wall art press botanical
  5. Position your stem on your mounting paper/linen. Using a toothpick, line the flower with glue and carefully adhere, using tweezers to manipulate it, remove a piece, etc if needed.
  6. Frame your new pressed botanical wall art by spraying adhesive on the back of your picture frame or a flat cardboard insert and press your paper carefully on the back so that it lays flat and in position.

Beautiful DIY pressed botanical wall art

I added mine to our guest bathroom. Because of it’s location, it’s one of the first things you see and detracts from the toilet. pinterest

Easy botanical wall art tutorial - a beautiful home or gift idea!

How to make beautiful botanical wall art

6 Comments

  • Debbie says:

    I just tried this with some lavender blooming in my garden, and it worked great… the pressed stems are beautiful with such a nice natural flow to them! I’m about to go to the store to buy fabric backing and frames to complete the project. I’m surprised by how long my stems are though, once I measured — I hope I can find frames to fit. I was going to make 2 tall thin pictures, but since my stems are so long, I may just make one large picture like you did. Thanks for sharing this technique… so much better than waiting weeks while the flowers press in books.

  • Mel says:

    Do you know how long they will last? I’m concerned that there will be fading and possibly the plant/flower coming apart over time.

    • Julie says:

      For years! They’re completely dried already so should remain in tact as long as they are not touched. My grandmother had dried flowers that retained their color for as long as I could remember. Enjoy!

  • Valley says:

    Hi Julie, Gorgeous!!
    Do I put glass over them?

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