How to Make Window Boxes

LAST UPDATED: May 07, 2020 | PUBLISHED: Apr 01, 2013 | By: Julie Blanner

Learn how to make your own planters with this easy step-by-step tutorial to make window boxes that will add color and charm to your home. These DIY boxes are simple to make and even simpler to fill with beautiful blooms!

This project was truly a family affair, from shopping, to painting and planting.

When we purchased our house, we knew the existing window boxes {actually shelves for planters} were victims of wood rot. I was anxious to replace them this Spring to add charm and color to the front of our home.

I like to give a lot of detail in my how-to posts to guide readers through any questions. If you’re just here for the printable how-to guide, feel free to click “jump to how-to” right under the title of this post and you’ll head straight there!

A white diy window box filled with spring flowers.

This week, I’m working on the planter boxes for the two windows in front of our garage. Currently, there are “shelves” to place planter boxes on, but after years of watering, they are completely rotted.

I also want built-in boxes versus something that I put them on. I love the charm that they add.

DIY Window Boxes

Of course Chris and I will be building our own planter boxes – we picked up supplies last night!

A white wooden DIY window box filled with fresh spring flowers.

While I prefer for them to be the same length as the window they are hanging below, ours will be 6″ larger on each side to conceal damage that the existing ones will leave.

I’m already dreaming of ways to fill them for each season!

First, you need to decide how big you want your window flower boxes to be. We built our window boxes 62″ long {just a bit longer than our windows} after assessing the damage the originals left and now I actually love that they are over-sized!

A homemade white window box filled with blooming lavender.

Supplies needed to make window flower boxes:

Wood

Nail/Staple Gun

Clamps

Screws

Trim {3/4×1-3/4″ accent colonial shown}

Waterproof wood glue

Sand paper

Primer

Paint

Drill

Weed barrier

How to make window boxes:

Using a nail/staple gun adhere 5 boards together. Use clamps to hold them in place if needed.

A wooden window box in the process of being made.

Use screws to ensure they are secure.

A wooden window box in the process of being made.

Add trim to accent at the top, bottom or both.

A wooden window box in the process of being made.

Clamp it to the window box and use a nail gun to adhere it.

A wooden window box in the process of being made.

Use waterproof wood glue to give it a perfect finish along the seams before sanding {for an even edge}.

A wooden window box in the process of being made.

Prime your wood boxes inside and out to reduce wood rot before painting.

Drill drainage holes throughout the box.

A wooden window box in the process of being made.

Staple weed barrier over holes to keep soil from draining through.

Weed barrier over the drainage hole of a wooden window box.

Hang!

Tips to fill planter boxes:

  • Use empty aluminum soda cans or pine cones to fill the bottom of planter boxes without adding a lot of weight.
  • Use potting soil, which is much lighter and includes fertilizer for plants, versus top soil.
Empty aluminum cans lining the base of a window box for a lightweight filler before potting soil.

Finally, we added and edible garden! Begonias, carnations, chrysanthemums, clover, day lilies, lavender, lilacs, pansies, peonies, impatiens, and tulip {petals} are some of my favorites.

For early spring, I knew I could rely on pansies and lavender, not to mention that the colors will compliment our home and landscaping plans well.

As you may already know, I love lavender for its beautiful aesthetic, fragrance and versatility. Click here for some of my favorite lavender uses. Pansies are great for garnishes and salads. The height of the lavender balances the pansies.

Close up image of purple pansies in a window box.

Four free printables to Inspire Your Gardening

  • the garden journal – designed to keep record of what you have planted, whether it requires sun or shade, water requirements, the height it will reach, when it will bloom & care it requires
  • garden guide – a sketch of what you have planted that correlates with your journal
  • garden plans – a place to sketch your overall design
  • notes – detailed care, changes you may want to make in the future, etc
DIY wood window boxes on the front of a house filled with spring flowers
DIY wood window boxes on the front of a house filled with spring flowers

More Garden Inspiration

DIY wood window boxes on the front of a house filled with spring flowers

Completing this project has me excited to get started on the rest of our landscaping!

DIY wood window boxes on the front of a house filled with spring flowers
DIY wood window boxes on the front of a house filled with spring flowers

You can see our “completed” home here.

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How to Build a Window Box

Yield: 1
Prep Time: 1 hour
Active Time: 2 hours
Additional Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 30 minutes
Difficulty: moderate
Estimated Cost: $20.00

Learn how to make your own planters with this easy step-by-step tutorial to make window boxes that will add color and charm to your home. These DIY boxes are simple to make and even simpler to fill with beautiful blooms!

Materials

  • Wood
  • Screws
  • Trim {3/4×1-3/4″ accent colonial shown}
  • Waterproof wood glue
  • Sand paper
  • Primer
  • Paint
  • Weed barrier

Tools

  • Nail/Staple Gun
  • Clamps
  • Drill

Instructions

  1. Using a nail/staple gun adhere 5 boards together. Use clamps to hold them in place if needed.
  2. Use screws to ensure they are secure.
  3. Add trim to accent at the top, bottom or both.
  4. Clamp it to the window box and use a nail gun to adhere it.
  5. Use waterproof wood glue to give it a perfect finish along the seams before sanding {for an even edge}.
  6. Prime your wood boxes inside and out to reduce wood rot before painting.
  7. Drill drainage holes throughout the box.
  8. Staple weed barrier over holes to keep soil from draining through.
  9. Hang!

Notes

Tips to fill planter boxes:

  • Use empty aluminum soda cans or pine cones to fill the bottom of planter boxes without adding a lot of weight.
  • Use potting soil, which is much lighter and includes fertilizer for plants, versus top soil.

Disclosure