Growing a Cutting Garden

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  • Have you ever dreamed of having fresh flowers at your fingertips? Flowers that can be cut from your backyard on a whim versus purchased at the florist or grocery store. I always have and while I’ve had some blooms, it’s really been hit and miss depending on the season. This year I am creating a cutting garden that Spring, Summer and Fall I can enjoy daily blooms.
    I’ve enlisted the help of local florist, Amy Cason, to see what she is planting in her garden. Because we live in the Midwest and our weather is ever changing, she recommended some easy to grow flowers including zinnias and cosmos. Zinnias are great in full sun. They are one of the easiest annuals to grow, they grow quickly, and best of all, they bloom heavily {Summer to Fall}, meaning plenty to cut from! They only require moderate soil moisture, which makes them a great choice for me! I’m horrible at watering on a daily basis! Cosmos also bloom Summer to Fall and are tolerant to heat and dry conditions.
    Peonies, hydrangea and hostas are all great staples to include in your cutting garden that are best suited for shady areas. I love using the tiny blooms from hostas as accents in arrangements.

    colorful zinnias

    I also plan to include daylilies in my garden because they require little to no care at all and last for years, even multiplying. While daylilies will never be used by florists because of their short bloom time, they are great for personal arrangements at home and can last 2 days when cut and arranged immediately.
    I’m really looking forward to planting dahlias this year. They can be a little fussier than the other flowers I mentioned, but I think they’ll be worth the effort! Planted in late May, they will start blooming in mid-July and cease at first frost. They require regular fertilizing and deadheading {pinching/snipping dead blooms to encourage growth}.
    Other flowers I’m considering are poppies and lily of the valley, just as Amy. What do you plan to include in your garden this year?
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